Spirituality

Coaching Psychology topics of interest to members and guests.
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silmcoach
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Spirituality

Post by silmcoach »

From a SILM® perspective, spirituality is a frame of mind. SILM® is an acronym for Spatial, Intuitive, Logical and Material. With the current financial turmoil and political uncertainty, it is understandable that the Logical and Material modes (and associated areas of the brain) may be running in overdrive

It is easy to forget that beyond our experience of the arbitrary World in which we find ourselves there is an underlying human being (physical organism) that evolved to survive the natural world, primarily using the Spatial/Intuitive mental modes. Mindfulness may be the “latest fad” but actually it is nothing new. We began as mindful beings relating as one with the natural world. Rekindling that connection as often as possible may help avoid getting stuck on the material treadmill.

See also Spirituality in the Workplace
silmcoach
Greatest wealth - happy heart, peace of mind :D

silmcoach
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Posts: 236
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2005 4:28 pm
Location: Dorset, UK
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Re: Spirituality - Aboriginal sixth sense "Leean"

Post by silmcoach »

Julia Bradbury is in Western Australia, near Broome, in the Outback.

Long before the cities and towns of Western Australia were built people lived there for tens of thousands of years. Here she meets Neville Palina, his wife Jo, and their two kids, Simone and Angelique. Neville's ancestors have lived in the area for thousands of years and here he lives by their rules, keeping their ancient traditions alive.

On first meeting Neville shows Julia a small piece of wood with a sweet smell, which he calls, "pick me up smoke". He explains that they burn this wood when they are traveling through someone else's boundary, because its smell travels on the wind and it lets those ahead know they are on their way and food will be prepared to welcome them on their arrival. Today, Neville and his family live in Broome, where the kids can go to school. But they still use their place in the bush as a weekend home.

Walking out into the bush Neville explains that all you guys see when you come here is bush. He says, "I don't see bush, I see a supermarket and a chemist." He points out a little tree, and tells Julia that it's fruit will fix any sickness you've got. If you ate the seed pod you would die. But if you let the Emu eat it and then eat the Emu it would have got rid of the poison. Like a filtering process, says Julia, Neville agrees.

Pointing to a vine, he says it will knock a migraine down in 90 seconds. Find a young juicy one, crush it with your finger nails, and the juices come out of it. Then wrap it round your head, and the juices go through the pores of the skin and knock the headache away in less than 90 seconds. Neville goes on to explain that if you get stranded out in some country and you need to eat, the best thing to do with any vegetable or fruit is take it and put it under your arm first. If you get a reaction, don't put it in your mouth.

They all head off to the river to go fishing. Neville's been teaching his children how to survive in the wilderness since they were toddlers. They've been pulling fish up since they were three years old. They normally fish within sight of each other because, as Neville jokes, he can throw his two kids in if a crocodile's coming, to distract it. They laugh.

Julia says it's a beautiful spot, Neville says its their backyard. Julia asks, "You've obviously taught your kids all the life survival skills that they need, but you can't watch them 24 hours a day, they must come down on their own some times." Neville explains that in his culture you've got to give these kids as much information as soon as you can. Pointing to some Brominey(?) Kites flying nearby, Neville explains that when you hear them screech, that's hey, come and look at me. Once he's got our attention he will dive down and hit the water right on top of a salt-water crocodile, and that's your warning, the birds spot the crocs. Neville shows Julia some tracks in the sand that are from a small crocodile.

Julia asks, "you must have had trouble with crocs at sometime." No, says Neville, you follow your Leean. That's touch, smell, feel, taste, we use those senses all the time, but there's one sense that we forgot to use in the Western World." Leean, explains Neville, "some people say it's your third eye, your gut instinct, intuition. It's really you're protective barrier. We are taught in the Western World to ignore that. But in the traditional world, that's the first sense. If you get this feeling inside to get out the water, don't say, I'll have one more cast, just get out of the water. If you believe that, follow it, honestly, no harm will ever come to you."

So Julia takes the plunge. Her leean says it's okay, and so does Neville. Fishing with the kids, Simone tells Julia that leean is a really strong word. Everyone knows the meaning of leean, but I just don't think many people still recognise the sense of it. They don't have that feeling, they've got it, they know what it is, but they don't know when to read it, and how to read it. It's a gut feeling, you kind of pick up a feeling, that's not normal, somethings wrong. They can't pick up that feeling and know that something is wrong.

Australia with Julia Bradbury, Ep.4 "Western Australia (Perth/Broome)" First shown on ITV, March 14, 2019
silmcoach
Greatest wealth - happy heart, peace of mind :D

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